Yes, it’s been 30 days since I left Bermuda and five more since I left St. Augustine. In the last week I have not seen a ship, and have had only a half dozen birds and one school of dolphin give me company.

At this, the 30th day, Dodge Morgan’s position relative to mine (he did his in 1986) is that he is 350 miles north east of me. So, essentially given that we are heading south east at this time, we are neck and neck.

Yesterday evening, and into this morning, there was no wind and I think it’s going to happen again. When there is no wind the yacht rolls around on the swells left over from the weather, and so the sails, useless for propulsion without wind, slap and bang in a maddening and expensive manner. So last night, it was windless and I dropped all sails. It was a sleepless night waiting for wind to return, and everything in the boat banging and sliding every few seconds as we rolled one way then the other. All this will end once I can get far enough south to get into the westerlies, but without much wind it will take time.

Power management is a real challenge. I have shut down my refrigerator and everything else that I don’t need.

Blog4 comments

4 Comments
  1. Bruce Schwab says:

    Hang in there Stanley, the wind will come! Heal up as much as you can in the meantime, be careful.

    Best wishes from Maine, Bruce

  2. Jim Balestra says:

    Hi Dr. Paris,

    I’ve been following your endeavor with sincere respect and interest since seeing you off in St Augustine.

    How is your health, specifically injuries, subsequent to your debacle in removing strands of the foresail from the shrouds?

    I wish you much success and safe conquest!
    jim

  3. Dan Lee says:

    I’m enjoying watching your progress. I live your frustration when there is no wind and you hear the sails slatting and I get super excited when you are at 9 – 10 knots!

    How’s your back and ribs from your fall?

  4. Arthur Maroney says:

    I shared your disappointment, but admire your common sense. Great effort, and may other sailors learn from your good judgement. Arthur Maroney. P. S. I am trying to recoup from a spinal disk problem using therapy and hope to sail again without having surgery, so our interests cross on two paths.

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